The first woman to fly commercial to space describes what it’s like to see Earth from 55 miles up

<em>Virgin Galactic’s astronaut instructor, Beth Moses, looks out the window during her first test flight</em>”  data-src=”https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/6ZmVhIQlWrvTMWFNSb9baEglGDI=/424×0:2704×1520/1310×873/cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_image/image/63249192/Chief_Astronaut_Instructor_in_Space.0.jpeg”></p><p id=On February 22nd, Virgin Galactic’s passenger spaceplane VSS Unity took to the skies above the Mojave Desert in California during a test flight, carrying a type of rider it’s never had before. On board the vehicle was Beth Moses, the first passenger the Unity has ever flown. Along with the plane’s two pilots, the trio climbed to a height of 55.85 miles (89.9 kilometers) — what many consider to be the beginning of space.

The short flight qualified Moses for commercial astronaut wings from the Federal Aviation Administration. And that means she’s now the first woman to fly to space on a commercial vehicle.

After the groundbreaking test flight, we caught up with Moses to…

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