U.S. Army demonstrates the digital future of combat vehicles

The U.S. Army demonstrated an exciting vision of how cutting-edge robotics technology could be used to revolutionize the future of combat vehicles.

Engineers from the U.S. Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center and Next Generation Combat Vehicle Cross Functional Team have demonstrated the Mission Enabling Technologies-Demonstrator and Robotic Combat Vehicle surrogates, components of the NGCV Phase 1 efforts, at Camp Grayling, Michigan, during a recent test.

“This technology is the very precipice of a revolutionary change to how we fight future Wars,” said Maj. Cory Wallace, robotic combat vehicle lead for the NGCV CFT.

The Next Generation Combat Vehicle’s manned-unmanned teaming concept would leverage a protected tether between the NGCV Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle and the Robotic Combat Vehicle in order to provide Soldiers with the capability to safely engage in combat via remotely controlled autonomous systems.

The new generation of combat vehicles is intended to replace the Bradley starting in 2026 and is designed to better operate in future environments that would allow soldiers to maneuver to a position of advantage and to engage in close combat and deliver decisive lethality during the execution of combined arms maneuver.

“What the NGCV means to the future of warfighting is? It’s not an evolutionary change. Where it’s not an increment we’re not just going to be able to and see the enemy quicker,” said Maj. Cory Wallace, adding that “It’s gonna revolutionize the way we fight.”

Speaking to WPBN’s reporters, Ross Coffman, the director of Next Generation Combat Vehicles confirmed that Army has begun test robotic combat vehicles that he is hoping will help save lives and win future wars.

“This is a big step for our army, as we try to figure out how we want the future army to look and fight, and in a perfect world we would really love for a robot to go in and figure out what’s going on,” said Jeff Langhout, the director of Combat Capabilities Development.

Main Source
Author

You might also like More from author

Comments are closed.